ArchiMate Patterns – Technology Layer

General Geekery

The technology represents the low level hardware, software and connectivity.

Much like last weeks Application Layer post, I’ll split this out for the basic pattern, and then a number of different examples which will hopefully make some sense.

Pattern

Node

A node represents a computational or physical resource that hosts, manipulates, or interacts with other computational or physical resources.

ArchiMate 3

The “Node” is the most generic representation of a server. I tend to think of the node as the container for operating system, system software, artefacts and the physical hardware.

Device

A device is a physical IT resource upon which system software and artifacts may be stored or deployed for execution.

ArchiMate 3

The usage of ArchiMate and Archi models should be derived from the questions that you want to answer. When I first began modelling, I wanted to separate the logical server (node) from the physical or virtual…

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By Alberto D Mendoza

Use jArchi to draw Archi relations from Azure service map

ICT things I find interesting enough to share

This blogpost is about a script…

Azure Service map

Azure service map is a really cool thing.  It basically shows you all network connections your servers make when running.  You can view this information in a table or in a visual form.

Picture taken from: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-monitor/insights/service-map Out of the box service map functionality.  The script we discuss here will create something similar directly in Archi..

Now, does this look interesting?  Sure it does, I see the sever, the connections it makes to other servers, I see the processes that start the connections…  all of that in an easy to use interface.  When migrating to cloud this is really valuable information.  When doing firewall projects or management also.  It helps you decide if you should open that port or not.  There are more cases where this information is a huge time saver.

I am not going to write on how to setup this, the microsoft…

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By Alberto D Mendoza

“Enterprise Architecture As A Service” – Why?

The Open Group Blog

By Terry Blevins, Fellow of The Open Group, Enterprise Architect at Enterprise Wise LLC

The previous TOGAF® User Group meeting was held by The Open Group in London on April 18, 2018. In that meeting, a number of very interesting questions were asked by the attendees. One topic in question was “Enterprise Architecture (EA) As A Service”.  Was “EA As A Service” considered possible, and/or useful? And if so, why? Great questions!

My immediate reaction to these questions was – yes Enterprise Architecture could, and in my opinion should, be offered through a set of services, and yes it would be very useful. An unasked question was what would it be like – but that’s another blog!

First, I guess I should describe what I mean by “EA As A Service” and the best way to do this is in comparison to something – but I am having…

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By Alberto D Mendoza